Join Tribesports today – it's free!

Tribesports is the home of sportspeople and sports challenges.
Join the fun and start sharing your sports activities with people like you.

20111101191720-nicholas

Nicholas J asked the question in Let's Run

When you run, do you land on your forefoot, midfoot or heel?

Last year I began to run often, and quickly realised that I've been a chronic overstrider for my entire life. I guess I always thought, if I make each step really big, I'll go faster.

This overstriding meant that I was landing heavily on my heels, which would quickly give me a stitch.

I now focus on striding with my feet landing under or slightly behind me, leaning forward a bit. Straight away, this completely changed running for me, and made previously challenging distances a really fun experience.

It would be great to hear how others run, and any changes that you've made to your technique.

Your answer

Answers (19)

Mid-foot, always mid-foot. Heel striking will injure you, that's a given. A total fore foot strike (like running on your toes) is not good either, the toes aren't big enough to take the forces.

Sports-iqsilver Eoin O answered Comment

20120514135718-hluva

Partly heel is not as bad as many people think. Especially when running slow.

Darren L and Annie R encouraged this.

You need to be a member of Tribesports to comment.

Join or sign in

2

I'm currently trying not to run on my heels, with absolutely no success!  Will try and emulate your leaning, see if that helps, thanks.

Sports-iqgold Jonathan H answered Comment

20121031135302-climbingpanda

And if you're anything like me it means that you'll also get very muddy all over from sliding over.

Jonathan H and Phil T encouraged this.

You need to be a member of Tribesports to comment.

Join or sign in

2

I'm a mid-foot striker and I monitor my stride length while running. If the stride is too long, I can't help but heel strike. Shortening the stride to a point where there's a comfortable spring in my step seems to help with forward propulsion. 

Sports-iqsilver Neil C answered Comment

You need to be a member of Tribesports to comment.

Join or sign in

2

When wearing trainers I heel strike horribly, currently trying to adjust to wearing vibram five fingers which I can't heel strike in as it hurts.

I heard that quite a few barefoot runners who transition from heel striking in trainers to landing on their forefoot in VFF or something similar develop metatarsal stress fractures but this is probably due the foot being used in a very different way and having the padding provided by the trainers removed.

It certainly feels better on my legs when using the front of my foot compared to the jarring feeling of heel strikes

Sports-iqbronze Alexander H answered Comment

You need to be a member of Tribesports to comment.

Join or sign in

2

Heel to mid-foot striking (more on the heel though) After my revalidation, and after a few goals I have set for this year I'll have my running technique evaluated. And check what the way forwards is. I am seriously thinking of going mid-foot, and if this is the way forward to 20 years of running injury free for me, then I'm in...

Gunter V answered Comment

You need to be a member of Tribesports to comment.

Join or sign in

2

Interesting - I'm a relative novice (10k level, but working at it) - and have pains behind my knees - dont think its IBT as it doesnt stop me running, but which I put down to having a too small running stride. so ive been trying to think about widening it a bit.

otherwise, I've noticed i tend to land mid-shoe.

Sports-iqsilver David H answered Comment

You need to be a member of Tribesports to comment.

Join or sign in

1

I have had two friends who have recently transitioned to barefoot using VFF's and have suffered metatarsal stress fractures. I'm not saying it is a bad thing to do, I think it is probably a good thing just be careful. Take it slow and let your body adapt. I am a heel striker but have been trying one short run a week on soft ground in my vivo's.

Bethan M answered Comment

20120628093801-eoin

They *may* have gone too far too fast. When I started running in the VFFs I would only use them for warm ups and then switch into my "normal" runners for the main part of the run. I took my sweet time getting used to them :-)

encouraged this.

You need to be a member of Tribesports to comment.

Join or sign in

1

People will naturally run a certain way and sometimes if you fight what is natural it can cause injury. I'm a heal striker and over probate but (touching a lot of wood) apart from suffering from sore calves I've never had a specific running injury. If you are trying to change your natural running gate just be careful and don't expect to change from a heal striker to mid foot quickly!

Sports-iqgold Laura N answered Comment

You need to be a member of Tribesports to comment.

Join or sign in

1

I run toe to mid. I had to make a huge effort not to run on my toes, something to do with the fact that when I walk I naturally go up on my toes. I have no idea why this is and people have tried to "teach" me how to walk properly but to no avail. I agree with @lauranathan don't expect your gait to change over night.

Sports-iqsilver Sarah L answered Comment

You need to be a member of Tribesports to comment.

Join or sign in

1

Interesting. I think I land naturally on my heels, but I have been trying to vary this and just be more conscious of how I am landing. Where I live is quite hilly, so I have started trying to lad more towards the front of the foot when I am running up a hill....will be interetsed to hear more about everyones experiences

Sports-iqsilver Sarah M answered Comment

You need to be a member of Tribesports to comment.

Join or sign in

0

Laura just to say that heel striking should not be considered natural gait, heel striking came in play when we as human beings went into shoes that the running industry designed for us, shoes that encouraged heel striking and lazy biomechanics. If you try walking barefoot (completely barefoot) hitting on your heels you will notice that it hurts a lot and you would instinctively switch into walking on your forefoot. I do agree though that if you are trying to change your gait you should do it very slowly, re learn the movements and re map them into your brain. I personally think that vFF s are not anymore the best barefoot transition minimalist shoe...

Nikos G answered Comment

You need to be a member of Tribesports to comment.

Join or sign in

0

Mid foot, although I always thought I was a bit abnormal for doing that and thought it was something to do with having a high arch.  Glad to know it's normal though, sometimes I fell like I'm 'plodding' quite heavily.

Sports-iqsilver Katherine F answered Comment

You need to be a member of Tribesports to comment.

Join or sign in

0

Heel/midfoot. I leave forefoot for sprinting and better runners :) 

Sports-iqsilver Petr P answered Comment

You need to be a member of Tribesports to comment.

Join or sign in

0

Heel strike for me:) I tried for 8 weeks late last year to convert to a forefoot strike following POSE and I basically got slower, fustrated and injured so I went back to heel striking. I even had couching, video anaylsis but I run far better heel striking.

Heel striking is not as bad as everyone makes out, depending on where you foot lands, how heavy you land etc. it is not the devil that everyone makes it out to be.

Everyone is different, we do not have the same genitics so we can't all run the same. If it isn't broke, don't fix it :)

Sports-iqbronze Darren L answered Comment

You need to be a member of Tribesports to comment.

Join or sign in

0

Mid foot as it's best for me absorbing the impact. That's what I have found anyway.

Karen M answered Comment

You need to be a member of Tribesports to comment.

Join or sign in

0

Mid- to forefoot. Most of what I've read/am reading says that's the most natural position. Ultimately it's about you and your comfort and your objectives. One size foes not fit all.

Sports-iqgold Peter M answered Comment

You need to be a member of Tribesports to comment.

Join or sign in

0

This is a great topic - and I have to say I agree with Peter M's comment that "ultimately it's about you and your comfort and your objectives. One size foes not fit all."    I am an under-pronator  - so I usually land mid to outer-forefoot and then roll in and lift off.  Understanding your personal pronation type is crucial to analyzing your running pattern, as well as choosing the proper running shoes.   On another note - I usually "change-up" my running method to vary my intensity and monotony... so for longer runs, I will run my normal style, then change to forefoot/toes, then smaller stride but faster...etc... It works for me. :)

Eric B answered Comment

You need to be a member of Tribesports to comment.

Join or sign in

0

Always been a heel striker ( and over pronator)..probably due in part by being encouraged, as a junior at a running club, to take long strides with high knee lift and an inbuilt aversion to running down hill at more than a snails pace! Over the years the stride has shortened naturally but a few years ago I picked up nasty achilles injuries to both achilles as a result of too much karate training. Karate was kicked into touch but the problem still continued and it was only regular sports therapy that kept me running..until I was given a book called ChiRunning by Danny Dreyer. This book adapts the principles of Tai Chi to running technique, including mid-foot strike, a slight lean forward (from the ankles NOT the hips) and a shorter stride with higher revolutions. There is obviously a lot more to it than that and adapting your running style should be a gradual process but 2 years down the line I am now a mid foot striker with strong achilles and my overall running has improved. I still over pronate but I can buy shoes for that! I am now making the transition to minimalist running, The mid-foot strike is now as natural as breathing and the shoes are so light I feel as if I am running on air.

Helen W answered Comment

You need to be a member of Tribesports to comment.

Join or sign in

-1

I guess this would depend on how fast we are running.... 

mmm when I run fast on my treadmill I run w no shoes on (just comfortable socks) and 

I always end up with the heel strike.... But when I go jogging with my brother out on the road, middle foot but I just seem to not be able to do the forefoot landing... Just doesn't feel right. Specially when going up or downhill lol

Sports-iqbronze Annie R answered Comment

You need to be a member of Tribesports to comment.

Join or sign in

-1

You need to be a member of Tribesports to answer this question.

Join or sign in

Related questions

Loading