Join Tribesports today – it's free!

Tribesports is the home of sportspeople and sports challenges.
Join the fun and start sharing your sports activities with people like you.

20130913185752-purity100

Anna W asked the question in Strength Training For Runners

Why do I always vomit after my run?

I've just started running few months ago, and I've been trying to run 4~7km twice to 3 times a week. However, 7 out 10 times after my run, I got very nauseous, in a few times, I actually vomited servery, once almost hospitalized for that. I tried to run with no food 3 hours before run, I vomited. I tried to run 1.5 hour after meal, I also vomited. At first I started running on treadmills, I vomited and almost pass out after 4km. So I started to run outdoor, it got better, but when I finished a 7km run, I was almost hospitalized by vomiting more than a dozen times and eventually passed out in my own house, unconscious. I just attended my first 10km marathon which I completed in 1 hour and 15 min, again, I went home vomited. I've consulted doctors and professional runners, no body seems to give me a solid answer, I wonder if anyone here can help?

Your answer

Answers (7)

Wow, sounds horrible to have to live with that. Have you tried cutting down the length of your runs to see with that stops the nausea, and then maybe slowly, and very slowly start building back up? I'm not a doctor so no idea why this might be happening and haven't ever heard of this before expect in case where people have worked themselves so hard (sprinting)

Sports-iqgold Laura N answered Comment

20130913185752-purity100

Tks Laura, it was really hard for me, but I still persevere, and my goal is to go for 21km half marathon next May/June. Right now I am training 6~7km for my run, once or twice weekly. Not sure if I should increase the training or increase the distance...

Laura N encouraged this.

You need to be a member of Tribesports to comment.

Join or sign in

0

You mention what you ate but not how much you drank. Nausea is an early symptom of dehydration. The current recommendations for hydrating while running is to obey your thirst and drink when your mouth is dry and you're feeling thirsty. In general, that means about 6 to 8 ounces of fluid for runners running faster than 8-minute mile, and 4 to 6 ounces of fluid every 20 minutes for those running slower than that. On longer runs, 90 minutes plus take some fluid with you, either water of a sports drink.

Sports-iqgold Sian S answered Comment

20130913185752-purity100

Hi Sia & Tony, Tks so so much for help. I have to admit drinking water or eating food before my run was initially my fear, thinking the liquid and food will upset my stomach and cause me to vomit more, knowing myself always vomit and all. Fact is, I did try to rehydrate myself by a few sip 'during' 1 of my run, and that caused me almost passing out from nausea and head spin after I reached home, tho I didn't actually vomited, but I couldn't even sit up straight for half an hour. In terms of warm up and cool down, I do practice those, but when I accomplished my first 10km marathon last month,which is the furthest distance I've run (I did not even trained up to 10km before the actual race), after the cool down and a short drive home, I vomited at my house. Gladly, not severely.

Tony G encouraged this.

20130913185752-purity100

a fitness trainer friend told me I am probably not suitable for exercise like running after so many incidence of vomiting, it was devastating to me because from a person who never exercised till few months ago, I've grown to enjoy and even love the feeling of running. The doctor I've consulted previously explained the reason for my nausea is due to lack of stamina and training, but I don't really buy that, because after running for 7km, I can still get nauseous from a 5 or 6km run 2 days later. Knowing my body is always reacting so 'abnormally', I only took bread or very light meal 1,2 hours before my run, a few mouthful of water, that's it. It seems better. I plan to go for my 21km marathon next May/June, right now I am running 6,7km fine, but I'm a little scared to push for 8km (too fearful of what will happen after the run). By this pace, I don't know if I will be equipped by next year, maybe I am just too ambitious...

Show 2 earlier comments

You need to be a member of Tribesports to comment.

Join or sign in

0

I agree with the fluids!  However, if you are consuming enough fluids for your runs have you talked to your doctor in prescribing an anti-emetic?  Zofran, Compazine.  Worth a try.  My rule of thumb is to hydrate and use a gel before I FEEL like I need it (with runs longer that 60min).  Once I am feeling dehydrated or exausted it is usually to late.

Catherine H answered Comment

20130913185752-purity100

Tks Catherine, thanks for the idea, I can ask my doctor in regards to those anti-emetic you just suggested. Still, I really hope I can overcome this prob without any assistance of drug. I mean, I grow to enjoy running nowadays, and I really hate to see myself having fear as hindrance for training to run longer. I plan to join the 21km race next year May/June, right now I am running 6, 7km without too much nausea. I will try the gel and see how it works, thanks again!

You need to be a member of Tribesports to comment.

Join or sign in

0

I am a beginner runner myself but I guess lack of oxygen can make you nauseous. Have you heard of the buteyko breathing method? It might help.

Rommel P answered Comment

You need to be a member of Tribesports to comment.

Join or sign in

0

Mam,running is a cardio exercise and require warming up since u r into distance running so first warming up your body is basic but heart also needs to be warmed up for that, thats why some times when we compete in long distance we start the race with a bang and in the mid way we feel we cant keep the pace and even vomit,that is because u train for long distance with certain pace but your body was not trained for high speeds, for that elite athlete in long distance before long races concentrate on speed workout more, now as far as the problem of vomit is concerned have fruits like an apple before a workout or even a sweet candy enroute will make u feel comfortable,avoid oily and greacy food before the workout, when u run your upper body should b relaxed( very difficult if u r into weight training) then before starting take fast breathing with open mouth and in the first km also as heart require more oxygen so more like a dog breathing(sounds funny but it works) . tyou may feel dryness of tongue but this again happens due to change in the heartrate suddenly so u ll have sliva back in no time. pls understand that running is a habit and to some it comes natrually they wake up and can run 10 km without any problem but to rest of the mortals running have to be done dedicatedly .when u r planning for 21 km your averrage running should be 14-15 km daily with a pace of 5-6 min /km (its high if u plan to compete ) so dont hurry up build your stamina/endurance first make sure that u have good running technique and good shoes ( this can make a huge difference) ....lastly pls ask the doctor that to get your tummy examined in case if it some complication which we dont know......regards

Enos M answered Comment

You need to be a member of Tribesports to comment.

Join or sign in

0

Really appreciate your sharing Enos!

Anna W answered Comment

You need to be a member of Tribesports to comment.

Join or sign in

0

The severity of the vomiting, how you describe it, makes me think that possibly the chemo-receptor trigger zone is getting activated.  A lot of people vomit when they work out, especially when they are new to exercise or have a particularly hard workout.  That isn't abnormal.  But the vomiting multiple times to the point of being hospitalized signals to me that something else is going on.  If it continues, I would absolutely return to the doctor office and if they can't give you an answer, you may want to see a neuroligist or Gastro intestinal specialist. Also, certain medications can make you naseous and might make you more susceptible to vomiting on exertion, so if you are taking medication, this could be something to ask your doctor about (if they haven't already excluded that in the differential).  If it gets worse, their are anti-emetic medications that prevent naseoa and vomiting.  I don't know if that would be appropriate or not but again, your doctor may be able to help you with it.  I would suggest going slow, staying hydrated and increase your distance/length of your run gradually.  There is a possibility that you are getting motion sickness.  Do you get motion sickness with any other type of activity?  Again, their is medication that helps with this too.  However, the whole point of exercise and running is to be healthy, so you don't particularly want to have to look to a drug related cure for the problem.  I hope you start to feel better as you run and I hope you figure out the cause of the vomiting!  

Sports-iqbronze Cara M answered Comment

You need to be a member of Tribesports to comment.

Join or sign in

0

You need to be a member of Tribesports to answer this question.

Join or sign in

Related questions

Loading